Those Other Lessons [To Be Learned] From the Rittenhouse Case

They should be learned, but in the folks most in need of the education probably won’t. (Although it does appear some in Kenosha figured this out.)

  • Mobs chasing innocent minors are not exercising peaceable free speech. Self defense applies.
  • Throwing objects at fleeing innocent minors is not peaceable free speech. Self defense applies.
  • Preemptively firing a gun as the innocent minor flees is not peaceable free speech. Self defense applies. (And funny how the prosecutor was careful to not put Ziminsky on the stand to be questioned.)
  • Mobs chasing innocent minors are still not exercising peaceable free speech. Self defense applies.
  • Hitting fleeing people in the head, knocking off their hat, is not peaceable free speech. Self defense applies.
  • Drop-kicking a kid down on the ground is not peaceable free speech. Self defense applies.
  • Hitting people with a skateboard is not peaceable free speech. Lethal self defense applies.
  • Pointing a gun at an innocent minor is not peaceable free speech. Lethal self defense applies.

Things that are peaceable free speech:

  • Non-inciting speech.
  • Non-inciting written words (signs).
  • Non-threatening gestures.
  • Silent marches.

Protest
pro·​test | \ ˈprō-ˌtest
1: a solemn declaration of opinion and usually of dissent: such as
a: a sworn declaration that payment of a note or bill has been refused and that all responsible signers or debtors are liable for resulting loss or damage
b: a declaration made especially before or while paying that a tax is illegal and that payment is not voluntary
2: the act of objecting or a gesture of disapproval
resigned in protest
especially : a usually organized public demonstration of disapproval
3: a complaint, objection, or display of unwillingness usually to an idea or a course of action
went under protest
4: an objection made to an official or a governing body of a sport

Riot
ri·​ot | \ ˈrī-ət
1a: a violent public disorder
specifically : a tumultuous disturbance of the public peace by three or more persons assembled together and acting with a common intent
b: public violence, tumult, or disorder

Attack
at·​tack | \ ə-ˈtak
to begin to affect or to act on injuriously
(ed- note the “begin”)

Defend
de·​fend | \ di-ˈfend
to drive danger or attack away from

If you wish to engage in protesting as a way of life, learning the differences between these things may be conducive to living out your full life expectancy. Failure to learn could earn you the life expectancy of a mayfly, Rosenbaum, or Huber.

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Bear

2A advocate, writer, firearms policy & law analyst, general observer of pre-apocalyptic American life.

One thought on “Those Other Lessons [To Be Learned] From the Rittenhouse Case”

  1. The DOJ or just-us department will come out with something so the Double Jeopardy clause is a dead letter.
    They don’t care if the young man has no assets and has never displayed any racial animosity.
    Any ends justifies the means of burning it all down better.

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