Congratulations, Maricopa County; you just publicly admitted your election network was compromised.

It seems that Maricopa County still has not fully complied with the Senate subpoena. They are refusing to turn over the routers and hubs used to network the election machines; ballot marking devices, tabulators, check in stations, supervisory pads, and such. And the reason is very interesting incriminating.

Maricopa County officials have not fully complied with the State Senate’s election audit subpoenas, a decision made to avoid causing a “significant security risk” to data utilized by numerous law enforcement agencies, the Maricopa County Attorney’s Office said Monday.

“We had previously believed that the risk would be eliminated by redacting the law enforcement data on the routers and not producing it. But we were informed that redaction did not eliminate the risk,” Deputy County Attorney Joseph LaRue wrote in a letter to Senate Audit Liaison Ken Bennett. “We also learned that if criminal elements or others gained access to this data, it might compromise county and federal law enforcement efforts and put the lives of law enforcement personnel at risk.”

Those routers supposedly only network the election gear, and never, ever connect to the Internet (which is one of the things the auditors want to check). I can think of no valid reason there would be anything in the logs that would related to numerous law enforcement agencies. No one was supposed to be connecting to the network exception elections officials. No device was supposed to be connected to the network except official election devices.

Deputy County Attorney Joseph LaRue just told the Senate that unauthorized people/agencies were connected. And he wants to hide who and why.

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I haven’t ridiculed Fauxci lately

Yeah, halfway though.

WATCH: Dr. Fauci says we’re ‘at least halfway through’ or in ‘the bottom of the sixth inning’ in the fight against COVID
“You and I are Major League Baseball fans”, replied Blitzer. “What inning are we in, as far as this COVID pandemic is concerned?” A typical baseball game lasts for nine innings, but if the score is tied, extra innings are added.

“We’re at least halfway through”, Dr. Fauci responded, “so we’re in the late innings.” “It’s not over”, he continued. “That’s the thing we’ve really gotta get people to appreciate. We’re going in the right direction; we’re seeing the light at the end of the tunnel, but now’s not a time to declare victory, it’s a time to get more and more people vaccinated.”

Apparently Fauxci is watching a game that’s time-delayed by four months.

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I’m going to start calling this the “psychostructure plan.”

It reflects the psychosis of the planners, and “psyche” in that it’s really an attempt to mentally reprogram the country.

Host Laughs as Pete Buttigieg Predicts 30 Senate Republicans May Vote for ‘Infrastructure’ Plan
“We’re seeing this weird law of political physics that something that is wildly popular among the American people on both sides of the aisle can’t always get that same support in Washington,” he said.
[…]
“How much of this can Republicans vote for? That’s what we’re working through right now,” he said. “But I’ve got to believe there’s 10 votes or 20 or 30.”

“Thirty,” host Kara Swisher said in disbelief. “Thirty?” she continued with a laugh.

Dude, the New York Times is laughing at your cracy commie ass. Take your meds and face reality.

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Tartarian Empire and the Great Mud Flood

I’d never heard of this one before.

Tartaria Mud Flood Reset: A Missing Legacy
Introduction

Tartaria (originally pronounced “Tataria” without the first “r”) is the name of the pre Mongolian empire that originated in northern Asia before spanning the entire northern hemisphere. Great Tartaria was the largest empire during its time and would have still been the largest empire today. The Tartarian empire flourished due in part of the civilization being a leader in advanced technology, free energy, and grand architecture.

Schizophrenia is sad.

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I think that’s grounds for a new trial.

Oh, my. How stupid can this guy get? If this is accurate, Chauvin should get a new trial, and this apparent idiot should be heading to jail.

REVEALED: Chauvin juror who promised judge impartiality now says people should join juries ‘to spark some change’, wore BLM shirt in 2020A juror on the Derek Chauvin trial who told the court that he had no prior knowledge of the George Floyd civil case was photographed last August wearing a shirt that read “Get your knee off our necks” and “BLM.” He stated last week that he saw jury duty as a means to “spark some change.”

Juror #52, now identified as Brandon Mitchell, reportedly told Judge Cahill on March 15 that he had no prior knowledge of the case prior to being summoned for jury duty.

No knowledge?

He’s the one on the right. In the BLM “get your knee off our necks” shirt.

And to make it worse:

Speaking in a show called Get Up! Mornings with Erica Campbell on April 27, Mitchell said that people should say yes to jury duty as a means to promote societal change.

“I mean it’s important if we wanna see some change, we wanna see some things going different, we gotta into these avenues, get into these rooms to try to spark some change,” he said. “Jury duty is one of those things.

I hope Chauvin’s attorney knows about this.

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Shirts

I had a thought, seeing a couple of reports about the Maricopa County election audit.

It seems the AZ SOS has slipped in Dem operative ringers as “observers.” The allowed the SOS three representatives, but instead of sending reps from her office, she sent operatives from Dim non-profits.

Then there are the color coded shirts worn by the folks in the audit center.

Blue shirts appear to be checking ballots for folds.

Yellow shirts are checking absentee ballots.

Green shirts are checking ballots for alignment issues.

Orange shirts are observers.

I suggest the SOS’ reps can be redshirts.

Added: Well…

“Two observers caught my eye because they were in pink shirts, unlike the rest of us.”

I guess pink is sort of red.

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Vaccine Stats

This statistic caught my eye, in a story about people dropping dead post-Moderna “vaccination.”

Data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows that in the U.S., there were less than two deaths per 100,000 COVID-19 vaccines administered. Death investigations didn’t find vaccinations contributed to patient deaths.

2/100K. Fatal. “Vaccination” continues. 240 million doses administered. At 2/100K,  that’s 4,800 deaths. Everything is fine. Nothing to see.

Let’s look back to 1976: Swine flu. A rushed vaccine. When 362 people developed — nonfatal — Guillain-Barré syndrome after 45 million had been vaccinated, they stopped use of the vaccine.

0.80/100K. Nonfatal. “Oh, shit. Stop, stop! Don’t use that stuff!”

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When is a mistake a crime?

I’ve been having a cordial exhange with Bill Choslovsky about his column arguing that former officer Potter should not be charged with a crime. He asked a very good question.

At some point the question becomes do all mistakes – even innocent ones with good intent – subject you to criminal liability?

All mistakes should not incur criminal liability. But some do. I see it as a matter of intent, and the egregiousness of both the error and the outcome.

In Georgia law, involuntary manslaughter is a criminal offense, and it is based on those conditions.

A person commits the offense of involuntary manslaughter in the commission of a lawful act in an unlawful manner when he causes the death of another human being without any intention to do so, by the commission of a lawful act in an unlawful manner likely to cause death or great bodily harm.

In Bill’s surgeon example, the doctor had no intent to cut an artery, and the error was relatively minor: mistaking a scalpel for a probe; something that could happen, especially with a scalpel covered in blood and seen edge-on.

In the Potter case, the officer did intend to shoot the suspect, but committed the errors of drawing the wrong weapon from the wrong position on her belt and failing to recognize that the Glock was not a Taser. Since Taser’s are designed not to be confused with firearms, I consider that error to be egregious. The vast majority of officers do not “accidentally” shoot suspects with sidearms they mistook for Tasers; I think the design is proven to be effective… if the officer is doing her job.

Potter did not intend to kill the suspect. If she had, then a murder charge would be appropriate. But the suspect’s death (outcome) was egregious.

Thus, involuntary manslaughter.

Now let’s look at a hypothetical case: Suppose the officer had correctly drawn and used the Taser (no lethal intent, no egregious error). But imagine the electrical shock occurred at just the right point in the cardiac sinus rhythm and stopped the heart. Out hypothetical suspect dies (egregious outcome).

No intent, no error, but death due to something beyond the officer’s control. Not a criminal offense.

Another example: Taser, but imaginary officer decides to teach suspect a lesson and makes him “ride the lightning” several times. Suspect dies.

No lethal intent, but outrageous misuse of the Taser, and egregious outcome. In Georgia, that would probably be upgraded to voluntary manslaughter, because while death was not intended, unlawful torture was.

Summary: Criminal liability depends upon intent, egregiousness of the error, and outcome.

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Don’t Confuse Gross Negligence With an Accident

As Bill Choslovsky does.

Don’t Confuse an Accident with a Crime
For those who think now-former Brooklyn Center police officer Kim Potter should be charged with a crime – let alone murder – I have a simple question: if a surgeon accidentally nicks an artery and kills a patient when she mistakes the scalpel in her hand for a prober, should she be charged with murder, or even manslaughter?

Answer: no.

That is a very poor analogy.

A better one would be that the surgeon needed a probe. But he asks for a scalpel (Potter draws wrong weapon). Then, failing to notice what tool he has in his hand (Potter fails to notice she has a heavy, black Glock with no manual safety, instead of a lighter, yellow, manual-safety Taser with a very different grip), and deliberately slices an artery (Bang.)

In neither case should the negligent, not accidental, actor be let off with a mere, “My bad. So sue me.”

“Error” does not equal “accident.” Try another analogy: Driver enters an Interstate through the OFF ramp, and proceeds to have a head-on collision at high speed, killing another driver. Should the “oops, ‘accidentally’ used the wrong ramp” driver be allowed to go with a “don’t do that again”?

In the shooting, one might cut a probationary rookie, with minimal training, a bit of adrenalized slack. But a 26 year veteran?

I’m a military veteran, former peace officer, former private security officer, and carry licensee. I can’t count how many times I mistook my firearm for a less-lethal tool and shot someone. I can’t count them because the number is zero. Zero in over 40 years.

For a period, for covert purposes, I carried an OC dispenser disguised as a pen. And never once did I mistake the spray for a pen and spray myself trying to sign a log.

One point of agreement with Mr. Choslovsky; Potter did not commit murder. I’m not familiar with the specifics of Minnesota law, but if this had happened in Georgia, I’d consider it involuntary manslaughter, a misdemeanor.

§ 16-5-3(b) A person commits the offense of involuntary manslaughter in the commission of a lawful act in an unlawful manner when he causes the death of another human being without any intention to do so, by the commission of a lawful act in an unlawful manner likely to cause death or great bodily harm. A person who commits the offense of involuntary manslaughter in the commission of a lawful act in an unlawful manner, upon conviction thereof, shall be punished as for a misdemeanor.

Added: For those curious, I did look up Minnesota Statute 609.205 MANSLAUGHTER IN THE SECOND DEGREE, which what Potter is charged with. The relevant part is:

609.205 MANSLAUGHTER IN THE SECOND DEGREE.

A person who causes the death of another by any of the following means is guilty of manslaughter in the second degree and may be sentenced to imprisonment for not more than ten years or to payment of a fine of not more than $20,000, or both:

(1) by the person’s culpable negligence whereby the person creates an unreasonable risk, and consciously takes chances of causing death or great bodily harm to another; or

“Culpable negligence” is the key. 1st degree manslaughter requires intent and covers crime of passion type killings.

The 2nd degree definition is similar to Georgia’s, but is a felony. A quick look at the options available to prosecutors indicates this was the lowest charge they could use in a matter that ended in a death.

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